Rachelle Kearns

Biography

Stimulated by study of abstract and lyrical expressionist art, Rachelle explores compositional drama with an emphasis on repetition and process in a graceful and convincing manner. Her paintings present a moment that resides somewhere between the real and the artificial – like the illusion of wind and light seen through closed eyelids. Her work displays an unerring sensitivity to line, color and form.

Rachelle continually achieves an authentic visual poetry that is aesthetic, tender and organically generated from her study and feelings of the world around her. She sees her works as giving voice to the easily overlooked, unseen, or missed moments of truth and beauty all around us – each work expressing a kind of 'faith' in her own invisible realities. She intends to intimately engage the viewer, inviting him/her to pause, look and appreciate.

A graduate of the University of Toronto Fine Arts/Art History program and possessing a Sheridan College Arts Degree, Rachelle has spent the past ten years painting and exhibiting in Canada, the U.S. and Switzerland.

Statement

I am a Toronto-based artist. Over the past decade, I have left my artistic imprint on a wide variety of spaces and collections in Canada and the US. In 1999, I graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree specializing in the 'Fine Arts and Arts History' program of the University of Toronto and received a Diploma in Art from Sheridan College.

Subtle and expressionistic, my paintings are semi-representational, all capturing a strong, natural sense of colour and composition. The subject matter typically explores the dynamic between nature and humanity. My art often deals with the duality of opposite ideas on an aesthetic and conceptual level. The depiction of this paradox creates visual impact and infuses my work with elements of the mysterious.

My images are the product of much study, investigation and reflection. My intentions are to intimately engage the viewer, drawing him/her into deeper thought and feeling. The latest 'mercyscapes' series attempts to answer the question, 'what does mercy look like?' One of the most interesting definitions that I've heard is that mercy is 'not getting what we deserve'. Why is such a beautiful word or idea so hard for us to grasp, so intangible? In our daily routines, in our neighbourhoods or our homes, where do we see mercy play out? A true understanding is complex. From my own research, mercy appears mainly in subtle ways. Mercy moments are fleeting. They tend to go unnoticed and are not typically public. These moments are beautiful and unexpected.

In the paintings, mercy is represented by circles of white light. Using various glazing techniques and blended brushstrokes, I am obsessed with creating landscapes or 'mercyscapes' that feel both timeless and ephemeral simultaneously. At first, the light (mercy) appears random, but over time, an order emerges that gives structure to the chaos.

Thumbnail Image
Thumbnail Image
Thumbnail Image
Thumbnail Image
Thumbnail Image


Thumbnail Image
Thumbnail Image
Thumbnail Image
Thumbnail Image